• Nutrition Technologies, PatBio Feed and Ynsect among Fish 2.0 finalists


    • September 21, 2017

    Nutrition Technologies, Vietnam, PatBio Feed, Chile and Ynsect, France are among the feed and nutrition companies who have been shortlisted to pitch to investors Nov. 7–8 during the Fish 2.0 Innovation Forum at Stanford University. The Forum is the culminating event in the Fish 2.0 2017 competition for sustainable seafood businesses.

    The group of finalists—winnowed from an initial pool of 184 entrants—stands out for its market traction, global character and high potential for impact on the seafood sector. About 50 percent of the finalists are post-revenue businesses, and more than half are based outside the U.S.

  • Fish 2.0 sustainability contest narrows field to 40


    • September 19, 2017

    Just 40 companies remain in the US-based Fish 2.0 sustainable seafood competition and will pitch to investors, Nov. 7-8, at Stanford University, California, the organizers announced Tuesday.

    “This is the strongest group ever,” said Monica Jain, the founder and executive director of the every-other-year competition, which started this time with 184 initial competitors and had been narrowed to 70 before the latest elimination round.

    Among the remaining finalists are VakSea, a Baltimore, Maryland-based company that has come up with a new way to deliver vaccines to fish, and OneForNeptune, a company with offices in California and New Mexico that’s making jerky out of white fish offcuts. Undercurrent News took a look at both companies in an article last month.

  • Focus on ‘seatech’ in Fish 2.0 finalists


    • Jenny Hjul
    • September 20, 2017

    FORTY companies have been named as finalists in this year’s Fish 2.0 competition, which aims to connect seafood businesses with investors.

    The finalists, selected from 184 entries, have been selected for their market traction, global character and high potential for impact on the seafood sector, said the competition organisers.

    They will now have the opportunity to pitch to investors during the Nov. 7–8 during the Fish 2.0 Innovation Forum at Stanford University from November 7-8, after which winners will be announced.

    "This is the strongest group ever," said Monica Jain, Fish 2.0 founder and executive director. The level of innovation is potentially both system changing and very profitable.

  • Fish 2.0 unveils list of 40 finalists


    • September 18, 2017

    "The finalists—winnowed from an initial pool of 184 entrants—stand out for their "market traction, global character and high potential for impact on the seafood sector."


    Fish 2.0 on Monday released the names of 40 companies that will pitch their ideas to investors Nov. 7–8 during the Fish 2.0 Innovation Forum at Stanford University, the culminating event in the Fish 2.0 2017 competition for sustainable seafood businesses.

    The finalists—winnowed from an initial pool of 184 entrants—stand out for their "market traction, global character and high potential for impact on the seafood sector," the group said. About 50 percent of the finalists are post-revenue businesses, and more than half are based outside the United States.

  • Fish waste innovators hope to net investors in contest


    • Jason Huffman
    • August 21, 2017

    Nick Mendoza, the founder and CEO of NeptuneForOne, is working to convince whitefish processors in the US that there is a better return to be had for their offcuts than those gained from having them turned into animal feed, fertilizer or garbage. He wants instead to make them into jerky, a product that can be sold as a healthy snack, high in omega-3.

    Mendoza's San Diego, California-based firm is one of 80 companies -- half the original field -- still vying for cash and other prizes in Fish 2.0, the every-other-year contest for innovations to improve the sustainability of seafood. It’s one of eight that would do so by reducing fish waste. All are hoping to identify potential business partners and investors.

    Though the excesses of agricultural production and the food left on consumers’ plates are what most people think about when it comes to food waste, there is a lot of waste in seafood, Monica Jain, Fish 2.0’s San Francisco, California-based founder, told Undercurrent News in a recent interview.

  • Food, Fuel, Medicine, Wrinkle Reducer: Algae Does It All

    National Geographic
    • National Geographic
    • Monica Jain, June 13, 2017

    You know what there’s really plenty of in the sea? Algae. And I am in love with them. Most people envision algae as slimy, possibly toxic, green scum. But this diverse group of fast-growing aquatic plants is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous.

    Algae got a lot of excited press a few years ago as a potential biofuel, but they’re turning out to be a sustainable super-ingredient with transformative potential in several massive industries: fish and other animal feeds, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, bioplastics and fertilizers. They’re also gaining favor as a vegetarian seafood. In all, the market for algae products could reach nearly $45 billion by 2023, according to a 2016 Credence Research market analysis.

  • Algae — life after biofuels

    Algae Industry Magazine
    • Algae Industry Magazine
    • June 13, 2017

    Monica Jain of Fish 2.0 writes in National Geographic about how the algae brand is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous — once again. Algae got a lot of excited press a few years ago as a potential biofuel, but they’re turning out to be a sustainable super-ingredient with transformative potential in several massive industries: fish and other animal feeds, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, bioplastics and fertilizers. They’re also gaining favor as a vegetarian seafood. In all, the market for algae products could reach nearly $45 billion by 2023, according to a 2016 Credence Research market analysis.

    Fish 2.0, an information provider for investors in the sustainable seafood sector, is tracking ventures growing microalgae as feed for shellfish or an ingredient in fish feeds, as well as growing algae to create needed jobs, especially for women in coastal communities. Some sell the algae they harvest to pharmaceutical and cosmetics companies; others sell to food companies.

  • This May Be the Key to Sustainable Aquaculture


    • Emily Monaco
    • May 22, 2017

    Just a few years ago, it was taboo to buy farmed fish, but now, experts are saying aquaculture might actually be the only way to ensure sustainable seafood consumption. The key to this apparent paradox is in finding something sustainable to feed all those farmed fish.

  • Can salmon talk bring Alaskans together? A new program is testing the waters


    • Laine Welch
    • February 4, 2017

    Salmon is the heart of Alaska fisheries — it almost singlehandedly spawned the push for statehood nearly 60 years ago. A new Alaska Salmon Fellows program wants to make sure Alaskans are poised to "shape the future" of the fish, and it is investing in the people to do so.

  • Community-Supported Fisheries Seek Growth Without Throwing Their Brands Overboard

    • Natasja Sheriff
    • February 2, 2016

    Community-supported fisheries are becoming a hit with finicky foodies and green consumers that like to be able to trace their seafood back to the dock, and sometimes the boat that it came from.

  • 2017 Leadership Awards: Vision: Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson; Salty Girl Seafood

    • Julie Besonen
    • January 13, 2017

    Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson, both 29, have worked on fishing vessels and in fisheries around the globe and share a commitment to accelerating change in the seafood industry.

    Their nearly three-year-old company, Salty Girl Seafood, supports small-scale fishermen and fisheries that harvest sustainably. They guarantee traceable seafood to consumers and promote stewardship of the oceans. Taking the guesswork out comes at a higher price than cheap seafood, which investigations have shown is often mislabeled.

2017 Supply Chain Innovation Track Sponsors 

 

Moore

Packard Foundation


 

Fish Free Feed

Rabobank