• Report: Algae Market to Reach $45bn by 2023


    • Emma Cosgrove
    • August 15, 2017

    After gaining “superfood” status, the market for algae could reach up to $44.7 billion by 2023, according to a new report from Fish 2.0, a business competition designed to increase investment in sustainable seafood startups.

    This year, the competition has seen a marked increase in the number of algae-focused startups applying to take part, with more than 10 of the 80 startups making it through to phase three (of four) of the competition working directly with algae.

    The new free report explains that algae could transform industries if propagation and distribution are able to mature. The report argues that market demand is already in place and coming from many different industries.

    Algae convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into fats and proteins that can be used in oils both for eating and fuel, as well as protein consumable by both humans and animals, and it also contains prized micro-nutrients.

  • Crackdown on illegal fishing has Indonesian fisheries bouncing back


    • Jason Holland
    • May 4, 2017

    Indonesia has made progress in its fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU) practices in its waters in the last three years, but it still has work to do, according to Her Excellency Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries of Indonesia, Susi Pudjiastuti.

    At the sixth European Tuna Conference in Brussels, held on the eve of Seafood Expo Global, Pudjiastuti shared her experiences of attempting to get the Indonesian seafood industry back on track after decades of mismanagement, in which overfishing by foreign vessels, including many illegal operators, had pushed its fisheries to the brink of collapse.

  • Could a Partnership Born of Fish 2.0 Become the Red Bull of Seafood?

    National Geographic
    • National Geographic
    • Monica Jain, January 6, 2017

    There’s a global divide at the heart of the seafood industry: the businesses that most need new technologies are often continents away from the businesses creating them

    Small-scale seafood operations in Asia, Latin America, and Africa catch and farm most of the seafood we eat. Startups in the U.S., Canada, and Europe are developing most of the technologies that promise to improve logistics, traceability, fish feeds, and aquaculture production. But distance and limited resources mean these businesses rarely meet. Bridging this divide is an essential step toward both healthy oceans and a healthy, equitable food supply

  • Southeast Asia Seafood Businesses: Apply Now for February Fish 2.0 Workshop

    Fish20.org
    • CARMEL, CA
    • December 23, 2016

    Fish 2.0 Competition Adds Dedicated Track for Southeast Asia Seafood Entrepreneurs

    New track guarantees three spots at final event for Southeast Asia participants; February workshop in Bangkok gives entrepreneurs a head start on applying for the global business competition

    Fish 2.0, the global competition and network for sustainable seafood businesses, is adding a special track for Southeast Asian entrepreneurs. The track will kick off with a three-day workshop focused on engaging investors and preparing participants to apply for the 2017 competition.

2017 Southeast Asia Track Sponsors 

 

Feed the Future
USAID
Winrock International
Packard Foundation
Walton Family Foundation