• Food, Fuel, Medicine, Wrinkle Reducer: Algae Does It All

    National Geographic
    • National Geographic
    • Monica Jain, June 13, 2017

    You know what there’s really plenty of in the sea? Algae. And I am in love with them. Most people envision algae as slimy, possibly toxic, green scum. But this diverse group of fast-growing aquatic plants is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous.

    Algae got a lot of excited press a few years ago as a potential biofuel, but they’re turning out to be a sustainable super-ingredient with transformative potential in several massive industries: fish and other animal feeds, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, bioplastics and fertilizers. They’re also gaining favor as a vegetarian seafood. In all, the market for algae products could reach nearly $45 billion by 2023, according to a 2016 Credence Research market analysis.

  • Algae — life after biofuels

    Algae Industry Magazine
    • Algae Industry Magazine
    • June 13, 2017

    Monica Jain of Fish 2.0 writes in National Geographic about how the algae brand is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous — once again. Algae got a lot of excited press a few years ago as a potential biofuel, but they’re turning out to be a sustainable super-ingredient with transformative potential in several massive industries: fish and other animal feeds, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, bioplastics and fertilizers. They’re also gaining favor as a vegetarian seafood. In all, the market for algae products could reach nearly $45 billion by 2023, according to a 2016 Credence Research market analysis.

    Fish 2.0, an information provider for investors in the sustainable seafood sector, is tracking ventures growing microalgae as feed for shellfish or an ingredient in fish feeds, as well as growing algae to create needed jobs, especially for women in coastal communities. Some sell the algae they harvest to pharmaceutical and cosmetics companies; others sell to food companies.

  • This May Be the Key to Sustainable Aquaculture


    • Emily Monaco
    • May 22, 2017

    Just a few years ago, it was taboo to buy farmed fish, but now, experts are saying aquaculture might actually be the only way to ensure sustainable seafood consumption. The key to this apparent paradox is in finding something sustainable to feed all those farmed fish.

  • Can salmon talk bring Alaskans together? A new program is testing the waters


    • Laine Welch
    • February 4, 2017

    Salmon is the heart of Alaska fisheries — it almost singlehandedly spawned the push for statehood nearly 60 years ago. A new Alaska Salmon Fellows program wants to make sure Alaskans are poised to "shape the future" of the fish, and it is investing in the people to do so.

  • Community-Supported Fisheries Seek Growth Without Throwing Their Brands Overboard

    • Natasja Sheriff
    • February 2, 2016

    Community-supported fisheries are becoming a hit with finicky foodies and green consumers that like to be able to trace their seafood back to the dock, and sometimes the boat that it came from.

  • 2017 Leadership Awards: Vision: Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson; Salty Girl Seafood

    • Julie Besonen
    • January 13, 2017

    Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson, both 29, have worked on fishing vessels and in fisheries around the globe and share a commitment to accelerating change in the seafood industry.

    Their nearly three-year-old company, Salty Girl Seafood, supports small-scale fishermen and fisheries that harvest sustainably. They guarantee traceable seafood to consumers and promote stewardship of the oceans. Taking the guesswork out comes at a higher price than cheap seafood, which investigations have shown is often mislabeled.