• Monica Jain. The Carmel Valley resident and Fish 2.0 founder riffs on sustainable seafood, and the industry’s future.

    • David Schmalz
    • April 14, 2016

    It wasn’t until Monica Jain was in her 20s that she fell in love with the sea, but it’s not her fault. A St. Louis, Missouri native, Jain studied biology at Stanford, thinking she would go to medical school. As a senior in need of extra credits, she took a scuba diving class, and made her first-ever dive in Monterey Bay near Lovers Point. “I was like, ‘Stop the press! There’s a whole world under here and no one told me!’” she says. “I was so upset.”

  • The Small but Growing Seafood Traceability Startup Scene

    Agfunder
    • Louisa Burwood-Taylor
    • March 30, 2016

    Until about five years ago, traceability in the seafood industry was virtually non-existent.

    There were only two scenarios when traceability was demanded, says Dick Jones, executive director of Ocean Outcomes, a non-profit working to improve the sustainability of fisheries globally: if a retailer requested a recall of a certain product, or if they rejected a product.

  • Can salmon talk bring Alaskans together? A new program is testing the waters


    • Laine Welch
    • February 4, 2017

    Salmon is the heart of Alaska fisheries — it almost singlehandedly spawned the push for statehood nearly 60 years ago. A new Alaska Salmon Fellows program wants to make sure Alaskans are poised to "shape the future" of the fish, and it is investing in the people to do so.

  • Why Dealmakers Are Getting Hooked on Aquaculture

    • Renee Cordes
    • February 8, 2016

    A small fish swallowed a bigger fish when the U.K.'s Benchmark Holdings bought Belgium's Inve Aquaculture from Coöperatieve Rabobank and Royal Bank of Scotland in December for about £227 million ($321.8 million).

  • Integrated Capital Funds Can Finance Environmental Markets

    • Meaghan McGrath
    • February 8, 2016

    As conservation finance gains more traction among mainstream investors, discussions about how to evolve early-stage environmental marketplaces to provide more conventional investment opportunities have taken over the halls of conferences. Integrated capital funds may offer one solution.

  • Video: Growing Seafood Demand Spawns Aquaculture Dealmaking Wave

    • Renee Cordes
    • February 5, 2016

    To view video click here 

  • Community-Supported Fisheries Seek Growth Without Throwing Their Brands Overboard

    • Natasja Sheriff
    • February 2, 2016

    Community-supported fisheries are becoming a hit with finicky foodies and green consumers that like to be able to trace their seafood back to the dock, and sometimes the boat that it came from.

  • The State of Green Business, 2016

    • Joel Makower
    • February 2, 2016

    The good news is that there's some good news. And that bad news is getting, well, less bad.

    That’s one way to read this year's State of Green Business.

    Our ninth annual report (download PDF), published today and produced in partnership with Trucost, continues our tradition of taking the pulse of corporate progress in sustainability, in the United States and around the world. It looks at both common measures (energy, waste and carbon) and some less-common ones (corporate reporting of natural capital profit or savings, for example, or companies’ low-carbon investments) over the past five years.

  • Tech and Business Innovation are Clearing Up Seafood's Foggy Supply Chain

    Huffington Post
    • Monica Jain
    • January 19, 2016

    The seafood industry's supply chain is notably opaque, complex and, in some areas, technologically deprived, experts say. But that doesn't mean it's stuck in the past. Dedicated efforts over the past two decades have improved the seafood supply chain's sustainability -- and we have an opportunity to do much more over the next several years.

    Businesses, NGOs and governments have been collaborating to improve seafood supply chain transparency and sustainability since the 1990s, as Meredith Lopuch of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation noted during a panel discussion at the Fish 2.0 Competition Finals & Seafood Innovation Forum in November.

  • 2017 Leadership Awards: Vision: Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson; Salty Girl Seafood

    • Julie Besonen
    • January 13, 2017

    Norah Eddy and Laura Johnson, both 29, have worked on fishing vessels and in fisheries around the globe and share a commitment to accelerating change in the seafood industry.

    Their nearly three-year-old company, Salty Girl Seafood, supports small-scale fishermen and fisheries that harvest sustainably. They guarantee traceable seafood to consumers and promote stewardship of the oceans. Taking the guesswork out comes at a higher price than cheap seafood, which investigations have shown is often mislabeled.

  • Slow fish: Preventing waste via packaging

    • Clare Leschin-Hoar
    • January 11, 2016

    BluWrap technology extending product shelf life, reducing carbon footprint of seafood

    It’s a radical idea, at first glance. In a world where faster is thought to be infinitely better, especially for a highly perishable product like fresh seafood, the very thought of slowing down the supply chain from days-to-market to months-to-market is deeply counterintuitive.

  • Can Land-Based Fish Farms Solve Farmed Seafood Woes?

    • Kristine Wong
    • January 7, 2016

    New contained aquaculture systems could bring local seafood to land-locked communities and change the industry in other important ways, too.

    More than half the seafood eaten globally is now farmed. And yet for some, aquaculture conjures up images of escaped fish, crowded pens, antibiotics, and ocean pollution in Asia, where nearly 90 percent of today’s aquaculture takes place. Now some entrepreneurs are bringing aquaculture on land. In the process, many hope to find a sustainable solution to the growing demand for a low-input, clean source of protein.

  • Competition hands out $195k in new awards to seafood startups (3)

    The business competition Fish 2.0 has handed out a new batch of service awards valued at over $195,000 to seafood startups, including to several companies from the Pacific Islands, organizers said.

  • Competition hands out $195k in new awards to seafood startups

    • Jason Smith
    • December 24, 2015

    The business competition Fish 2.0 has handed out a new batch of service awards valued at over $195,000 to seafood startups, including to several companies from the Pacific Islands, organizers said.

    The competition, which was held in Stanford, California on Nov. 10 and 11, brought together investors, non-profit organizations and fledging seafood startups who aim to take new approaches to transforming the industry.

  • Stirrings of a new seafood supply chain revolution

    Greenbiz
    • Monica Jain
    • December 16, 2016

    The seafood industry’s supply chain is notably opaque, complex and, in some areas, technologically deprived, experts say. But that doesn’t mean it’s stuck in the past. Dedicated efforts over the past two decades have improved the seafood supply chain’s sustainability — and we have an opportunity to do much more over the next several years.

  • Pacific Islands seafood startups face ‘capital gap’

    Undercurrentnews
    • Jason Smith
    • December 15, 2015

    Small seafood companies in the Pacific Islands face all of the regular challenges that small businesses face and then some: remoteness, high transportation costs, and small markets whose consumers often have little disposable income.

  • Entrepreneurs turn billion dollar seafood waste into profitable products (2)

    • Kristine Wong
    • December 14, 2015.

    Since he started working on commercial fishing and crabbing boats as a teenager, Craig Kasberg loved being out at sea. Yet he was bothered by the amount of fish waste he saw being dumped back on to the ocean floor.

  • Fish 2.0 Finals Spotlight Surging Innovation in Seafood

    • Monica Jain
    • November 29, 2015

    Our oceans and the people who depend on them are in trouble. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, about 70 percent of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited, overexploited or collapsing under the pressure of a $390 billion global seafood market. Yet analysts expect seafood demand to double by 2050, and island and coastal communities around the world depend on seafood for both sustenance and economic health.

  • Traceability, co-operation seen as keys to improving seafood’s sustainability challenges

    Undercurrent News
    • Jason Smith
    • November 25, 2015

    PALO ALTO, California -- Solving the myriad social issues like forced labor and environmental challenges like illegal fishing that the seafood industry faces has to involve traceability and co-operation, observers said.

    A panel of representatives from non-governmental organizations as well as the private sector speaking at the Fish 2.0 business competition held earlier this month, said that there is significant commonality among the goals of the many groups and private sector leaders working on seafood sustainability issues.

    For full article click here 

  • Announcing winners of this year’s Fish 2.0 competition—innovations in aquaculture

    • Tides Canada
    • November 25, 2015

    Tides Canada continues to support the Fish 2.0 business competition (via our Salmon Aquaculture Innovation Fund) to advance sustainable aquaculture solutions that protect wild salmon and the marine environment while encouraging a successful seafood industry.